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Hot Dog
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Hot Dog Trivia Quiz
Test Your Hot Dog Knowledge

 

There can’t possibly be anyone that doesn’t like a hot dog now and then. And for those who really, really like hotdogs, here’s a trivia quiz to test your knowledge about one of America’s favorite foods.

 

See how much you know about one of America’s favorite foods. 

 

(To find the answers, hover your mouse over the hot dog after each question.

Answers also appear at the end of the quiz.)

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A Hot Dog by Any Other Name… (top)

 

1. Where was the first hot dog created?

A) Vienna, Austria

B) Frankfurt, Germany

C) Chicago, Illinois

D) Good question!

1. D) Good question! - While sausages are mentioned in historical texts as far as the Odyssey of Homer, written in the 9th century B.C., the variant known as the "frankfurter" is rumored to have been invented in Frankfurt, Germany around 1484 A.D. However, the citizens of Vienna (Wien), Austria point to their own "Wiener" as the progenitor of the hot dog.

 

2. What did New York Polo Grounds hawkers call "hot dogs?"

A) Wieners

B) Tube steaks

C) Dachshund sausages

D) Doggies

2. C) Dachshund sausages – An old urban legend has it that when renowned sports cartoonist Tad Dorgan couldn’t spell dachshund, he wrote "hot dog" instead. The name stuck.  However, no copy of Dorgan's cartoon has yet been found, and both the practice of selling sausages in buns and the habit of calling them "hot dogs" were around well before the 1900s when T.A. Dorgan was supposedly "inventing" the term.

  

3. Where and when were hot dogs first served in buns?

A) 1921 World Series

B) St. Louis "Louisiana Purchase Exposition" in 1904

C) The Oscar Mayer company picnic in 1928

D) Boston’s 4th of July parade in 1918

3. B) St. Louis "Louisiana Purchase Exposition" in 1904 – Bavarian concessionaire Anton Feuchtwanger loaned his customers white gloves to protect their hands from the steaming wieners.  Most patrons failed to return these gloves, and his supply began running low. Feuchtwanger allegedly asked his brother-in-law - a baker by trade - for help. The brother-in-law improvised long soft rolls that fit the meat, and thus invented the hot dog bun.  However, others claim that a German immigrant sold sausages, along with milk rolls and sauerkraut, from a push cart in New York City's Bowery during the 1860's.  Another report states that in 1871, German butcher Charles Feltman opened up the first Coney Island hot dog stand, and sold 3,684 dachshund sausages in a milk roll during his first year in business. By the way, wieners and frankfurters don't become hot dogs until someone puts them in a roll or a bun.

 

4. What city can boast that its residents eat the most hot dogs, according to the "Top Ten Hot Dog Eating Cities" of the National Hot Dog and Sausage Council (NHDSC)?

A) Chicago

B) Baltimore

C) Los Angeles

D) New York

4. D)New York – In 2004, New Yorkers consumed $112.7 million worth of frankfurters and "better for you" hot dogs using statistics prepared by Information Resources Inc.  Hot dog sales in Los Angeles and the Baltimore-Washington came in at second and third in total supermarket dollar sales.

 

5. Which of these presidents served hot dogs at an official White House function?

A) Bill Clinton

B) George W. Bush

C) Harry Truman

D) Ronald Reagan

5. D) Ronald Reagan – in 1980.  Two other presidents also served hot dogs at official White House functions: Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter served them at a White House picnic in 1977 and Franklin D. Roosevelt served King George VI and Queen Elizabeth of England hot dogs and beer at a picnic during a White House visit in 1939.

 

6. How Long Was The World's Longest Hot Dog?

A) 76 feet
B) 567 feet
C) 1,996 feet
D) 1 mile

6. C) 1,996 feet – The Sara Lee Corporation made a 1,996 foot wiener in honor of the 1996 Olympics. It took over 2,000 buns to hold the huge hot dog that wrapped twice around the Georgia Dome field.

 

7. What color is the belt awarded to the World Hot Dog Eating Champion at the annual contest held in Coney Island?

A) Green
B) Red
C) Yellow
D) Black

7. C) Yellow – On July 4, 2004 champion Takeru Kobayashi set a new world record and walked away with a yellow belt after eating 53.5 wieners with buns in 12 minutes, earning the coveted mustard yellow belt and retaining his official world crown for the fourth year in a row. Known in the competitive eating world as “The Tsunami”, he earned his title by winning Nathan's Famous Fourth of July International Hot Dog Eating Contest in New York, a competition which started in 1916. Kobayashi also holds world records for eating cow brains. There’s just no accounting for taste, huh?

 

8. Why did the National Hot Dog and Sausage Council flew more than 37,000 hot dogs to Bosnia in 1996?

A) For distribution to the local residents, as part of their campaign against hunger

B) “Operation Wienerlift”, celebrating National Hot Dog Day, was done to say “thanks”

C) To feed the troops in support of their efforts

D) A fire at a production plant made them “unfit” for sale, and the Council did not want to see them go to waste.

8. B) “Operation Wienerlift”, celebrating National Hot Dog Day, was done to say “thanks” – The hot dog cargo was accompanied by 700 pounds of mustard, 15,000 boxes of CRACKER JACK and 3,500 pounds of beef summer sausage

 

9. What does Charlie Kazan have to do with hot dogs?

A) He has them for dinner every night

B) He has worked for Oscar Mayer for 60 years

C) He has made his own hot dogs for the past 30 years

D) Absolutely nothing - he is highly allergic to them

9. A) He has them for dinner every night - As the story goes, eighty-nine-year-old Charlie has eaten hot dogs for dinner every night of his life since he was 11 months old. He eats them on rye bread with the crusts removed-and still loves them.

 

10. In addition to Mr. Potato Head, what other food friends did Hasbro also produce in the 1960’s? 

A) Stanley Steak

B) Peppermint Patty

C) Burger Buddy

D) Franky Frank

10. D) Franky Frank – Other members of the less popular and quite bizarre Mr. Potato Head “Picnic Pals” set included Willy Burger, Frenchy Fry, Mr. Soda Pop Head, Mr. Mustard Head, and Mr. Mr. Ketchup Head.  They included ketchup and mustard colored parts, plus all new face pieces in the shapes of pickles and onions!  Another variety of friends for Mr. & Mrs. Potato Head were the “Tooty Frooty Friends” line, which included Oscar Orange, Pete the Pepper, Cooky the Cucumber, and Katie Carrot.

 

11. Tony Packo's Cafe` in Toledo, Ohio, made famous by being mentioned by Corporal Max Kinger in a M-A-S-H episode, has fed many celebrities.  To commemorate their visits, the café proudly displays

A) Pictures of the celebrities with Tony

B) Celebrity pictures which cover all the walls

C) Signed buns

D) Hot dogs that were bitten by the celebrities

11. C) Signed buns – Burt Reynolds was the first big name to eat at Packo's and sign a hot dog bun, when Tony’s daughter Nancy wanted him to write his name on something to commemorate his visit. It occurred to Reynolds to put his pen to Packo's breadstuff.  This precedent was followed by scores of celebrities, including President Clinton, Mickey Mouse, Emmitt Smith (Dallas Cowboys), and NASA astronaut Donald Thomas (who took Tony Packo's Hot Dog Sauce aboard Space Shuttle Columbia in 1997).  Thousands of autographed hot dog buns now are enshrined on Packo's walls. The tradition of "bun signing" continues to this day.

 

Baseball & Hot Dogs (top)

 

12. How many hot dogs will Americans eat in major league ball parks during baseball season? 

A) 4 billion

B) 26 million

C) 3 million

D) 11 billion

12. B) 26 million – That’s enough to stretch from Yankee Stadium in New York City to Dodgers' Stadium in Los Angeles! Or, it's even enough to circle the bases 36,000 times. Sometimes more hot dogs are sold than tickets!

 

13. "Little dog" sausages became standard fare at ballparks in 1893 in which city?

A) New York City
B) St. Louis
C) Cleveland
D) Boston

13. B) St. Louis – Bar owner and German immigrant Chris Von de Ahe, who owned the St. Louis Browns baseball team, introduced the hot dog to Browns' fans in 1893. This is the first recorded linking of hot dog with baseball. And speaking of baseball and hot dogs, Babe Ruth once ate 12 hot dogs and drank eight bottles of soda-pop between games of a scheduled double-header <burp>!

 

14. Hot dogs aren’t just for baseball fans!  In 1995, three Seattle Seahawk football players were fined $1,000 each for eating hot dogs on the sidelines of a pre-season game. Why were they eating these hot dogs?

A) The smell of hot dogs wafting down from the stands was simply irresistible to the hungry players

B) In celebration of National Hot Dog Day

C) A young boy bought the hot dogs for the players

D) It was lunch time

14. A) The smell of hot dogs wafting down from the stands was simply irresistible to the hungry players – Free safety and defensive captain Eugene Robinson, quarterback Rick Mirer, and defensive tackle Cortez Kennedy were fined for violating team rules. During the third quarter of a pre-season game in San Francisco, the three players were caught eating hot dogs while standing on the Seahawks' sideline. The three had seen action in the first half of the game and were not slated to return. If not for the presence of network television cameras, they might have been able to consume the hot dogs without being detected. The cameras, however, caught the players "trying furtively to eat the hot dogs."

 

How to Cook & Dress a Hot Dog (top)

 

15. According to a new National Hot Dog and Sausage Council poll, how do most Americans prefer their hot dogs cooked?

A) Grilled

B) Steamed

C) Pan Fried

D) Boiled

15. A) Grilled – 60% of Americans prefer hot dogs grilled.  Second choice was boiling, at 21%, followed by microwaving (8%), pan frying (4%) and steaming (3%).

 

16. What’s the favorite hot dog condiment of Americans age 35 and up?

A) Ketchup

B) Mustard

C) None – they are best eaten “au natural”

D) Chili

16. B) Mustard – Mustard remains the “wiener” at 32% (and 87% of hot dog eaters use it). Ketchup is preferred by 23% (though it ranks #1 among younger adults), though the Hot Dog and Sausage Council recommends against consuming ketchup on hot dogs after the age of 18. Chili came in third at 17%, followed by relish (9%) and onions (7%). Southerners showed the strongest preference for Chili, while Midwesterners showed the greatest affinity for ketchup. Nationwide, however, mustard prevailed. Interestingly, though ketchup remains one of the most popular condiments on hot dogs, "properly made" hot dogs, like the Chicago-style, usually lack the condiment. Those who consider themselves hot dog connoisseurs are often vehemently opposed to eating (or even witnessing) hot dogs with ketchup; they think the flavor of ketchup overpowers and destroys the taste of the hot dog instead of complementing it. In some Chicago hot dog stands and restaurants, ketchup is not offered as a hot dog condiment. Furthermore, asking for ketchup may result in a rebuff by the vendor (perhaps a refusal to serve the requested order or a slamming of hands on the counter).

 

17. What city’s citizens prefer their hot dogs topped with sauerkraut and Swiss cheese?

A) Berlin

B) San Francisco

C) Bern

D) Kansas City

17. D) Kansas City – Kansas City Dogs are served with sauerkraut and melted Swiss cheese on a sesame-seed bun. Elsewhere in the U.S., Easterners eat more all-beef hot dogs than any other region of the country. New York hot dogs are served with steamed onions and yellow mustard.  Southerners eat Slaw Dogs… dragged through the garden and topped with coleslaw. Midwesterners eat more pork and beef hot dogs than any other region of the country.  Chicago Dogs are served with yellow mustard (NEVER with ketchup!), dark green relish, copped raw onion, tomato slices, and topped with a dash of celery salt on a poppy-seed bun. And Westerners eat more poultry dogs than any other region of the country.

 

Hot Dog Etiquette (huh?) According to the Hot Dog and Sausage Council  (top)

 

18. What should be done with condiments remaining on the fingers after eating a hot dog?

A) Licked away

B) Wiped on your shirt or pants

C) Wiped on a napkin

D) Wiped using a wet-nap

18. A) licked away - not washed!  And do not use a cloth napkin to wipe your mouth when eating a hot dog, paper is always preferred.

 

19. To serve hot dogs:

A) Use plastic dishes

B) Use your hands

C) Use paper plates

D) Wrap it in newspaper

19. C) Use paper plates – China plates are forbidden.

 

20. What is the “right” way to add condiments to a hot dog?

A) Put condiments on the bun, then add the hot dog

B) There is no right way

C) “Dress” the dog

D) Dip them by hand into condiments of choice

20. C) “Dress” the dog - Do not put toppings between the hot dog and the bun. Always “dress” the dog and not the bun!

 

This Dog's on a Roll – The WienermobileTM (top)

 

1st WienermobileTM Vehicle

 

The WienermobileTM Today

 

A big part of promoting the hot dog is the traveling WienermobileTM. By logging on to Kraft Food’s web site (www.Kraftfoods.com) you can find out just where the WienermobileTM can be seen. Each year the WienermobileTM travels about 1,000 miles per week, or about 50,000 miles per year. If you’re lucky enough to spy it cruising the neighborhood, be sure and get on board.

 

21. Where and when did the first WienermobileTM cruise the streets?

A) Detroit, 1931

B) New York, 1928

C) Boston, 1934

D) Chicago, 1936

21. D) Chicago, 1936 – As an ad gimmick, Karl G. Mayer, nephew of the lunchmeat mogul Oscar Mayer®, invented the company's Wienermobile™. On July 18, 1936, the first Oscar Mayer® Wienermobile™ rolled out of General Body Company's factory in Chicago at a cost of $5,000 and was 13 feet long. The Oscar Mayer® company has a fleet of six cruising America these days. They go all over the place, spreading the good news about, well, Oscar Mayer® wieners, what else? The Wienermobile™ vehicle has traveled in the U.S., Canada, Japan, Puerto Rico and Spain. In the year 2000, it added Mexico and Germany to the list too!  Each Wienermobile™ vehicle travels about 1,000 miles per week or about 50,000 per year.

 

22. How much does a WienermobileTM weigh today?

A) 8,000 pounds

B) 2 tons      

C) 5,000 pounds

D) 1,000,000 hot dogs

22. D) 1,000,000 hot dogs – that’s about 5 tons of lean mean machinery that is twenty-seven feet long, 11 feet tall.

 

23. On what television show has the WienermobileTM appeared?

A) “Love Connection”

B) “Nightline”

C) “Sesame Street”

D) “Let’s Make a Deal”

23. A) Love Connection – along with “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno”, “Late Night with David Letterman”, “CNN Headline News” and “The Late Late Show with Tom Snyder”.

 

24. In how many movies has the WienermobileTM co-starred?

A) None

B) 1

C) 2

D) 4

24. C) 2 – "Ladybugs," starring Rodney Dangerfield, and "Another You," starring Richard Pryor and Gene Wilder.

 

25. What was the name of the man who handed out WienerwhistlesTM to children from his WienermobileTM?

A) Wee Willy Wiener

B) Oscar Mayer®

C) Little Oscar

D) Whistleman

25. C) Little Oscar – George Molchan, who portrayed company mascot Little Oscar died on April 12, 2005 at the age of 82. The WienermobileTM that George Molchan drove in life stood parked at his grave side, eliciting smiles from the dozens of friends and family present.  The 50 or so people at the Calumet Park Cemetery grave site broke into a chorus of the company theme song, "I'd love to a be an Oscar Mayer®  wiener," followed by a few quick blasts on miniature, hot-dog shaped whistles handed out to the crowd.  Not your typical burial, but Molchan would've loved it, a bystander said.
 

26. What city almost banned the Oscar Mayer® WienermobileTM?

A) Chicago, Illinois

B) Madison, Wisconsin

C) Detroit, Michigan

D) San Francisco

26. B) Madison, Wisconsin – (the headquarters of Oscar Mayer since 1955!) The city council — in this most progressive of American cities — sought to rid vehicular advertising from their fine streets. But then one astute council member asked the key question, “Are we banning Little Oscar?"

 

27. What are the people who drive the Oscar Mayer® WienermobileTM called?

A) “Hotdoggers” are the people who drive the Oscar Mayer® WienermobileTM s.

B) “Little Oscars”

C) “Wiener men”

D) “Frank Furters”

27. A) “Hotdoggers” – To become a “hotddogger,” you need a college degree and you should be skilled in the field of communications, journalism, advertising, marketing or public relations. More than 1,000 "wiener wannabees" apply to Oscar Mayer® every year for the right to be an official "Hotdogger" for one year—for the privilege of driving one of those big dogs down the street. But Oscar Mayer® picks only the top dogs; of those 1,000 applicants, only 21 cut the mustard. The 21 lucky wieners, er, winners are sent to Hot Dog High at the Oscar Mayer® headquarters in Madison, Wisconsin. The subjects at Hot Dog High are always "meaty." Students learn all about Oscar Mayer® history and products, get briefed on special events planning, and pick up the secrets to maneuvering their buns in traffic.  Graduates are officially sworn in by the President of Oscar Mayer®, and they take the Hotdogger Oath: “As official Hotdogger of the celebrated Oscar Mayer® Wienermobile™, I salami swear to uphold the dogma set forth here, and I promise to encourage wiener lovers nationwide to relish the delicacy, ketchup on the great taste of hot dogs, and give in to the craving once it's mustard. Be frank and furtermore, to be upstanding in a line for hot dogs at ball parks, barbecues, buffets, and other bashes. Journey into the streets, dachs und ports of my community, wish well to all comers, plump and lean -- and leave them with a wiener to roast about. As once I wished I were, now I am -- an Oscar Mayer® Wienermobile™ Hotdogger.”  And then they drive around in those vehicular vittles, telling people all about the wonders of hot dogs and Oscar Mayer® and other stuff. Some Hotdoggers have even appeared on MTV, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, and The Late Show with David Letterman.  Now that's what I call runnin' with the big dogs!

 

28. Who took a WienermobileTM for a test lap at the 1988 Indy 500?

A) John Andretti

B) Tony Stewart

C) Al Unser, Jr.

D) Robby Gordon

28. C) Al Unser, Jr. – He topped off at a speed of 110 mph.

 

29. How much did WienerwhistlesTM cost at the 1965 New York World’s Fair?

A) 2 cents

B) 5 cents     

C) a dime

D) they were free with the purchase of a hot dog

29. A) 2 cents – and they were sold in vending machines.

 

30. Who wrote the wiener jingle for Oscar Mayer?

A) Paul Anka

B) Richard Trentlage

C) Paul Simon

D) Oscar Mayer

30. B) Richard Trentlage - in 1963

 

31. Which symphony orchestra recorded the familiar ditty "I wish I were an Oscar Mayer® Wiener?"

A) Boston Pops

B) New York Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra

C) Madison Symphony Orchestra

D) Vienna Symphony Orchestra

31. D) Vienna Symphony Orchestra – In 1968 the Vienna Symphony Orchestra performed the tune in a commercial that ended with a little boy clapping at the orchestra's performance and then taking a bite out of a wiener. An announcer closed by saying "The Oscar Mayer wiener—a classic."  The ditty was also recorded by the Berlin Symphony Orchestra, as well as a teenage rock band, a string ensemble and a Nashville country western group.  My apologies if the little ditty is now stuck in your head for the rest of the day.

 

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Answers (top)

 

A Hot Dog by Any Other Name…

 

1. D) Good question! - While sausages are mentioned in historical texts as far as the Odyssey of Homer, written in the 9th century B.C., the variant known as the "frankfurter" is rumored to have been invented in Frankfurt, Germany around 1484 A.D. However, the citizens of Vienna (Wien), Austria point to their own "Wiener" as the progenitor of the hot dog.

 

2. C) Dachshund sausages – An old urban legend has it that when renowned sports cartoonist Tad Dorgan couldn’t spell dachshund, he wrote "hot dog" instead. The name stuck.  However, no copy of Dorgan's cartoon has yet been found, and both the practice of selling sausages in buns and the habit of calling them "hot dogs" were around well before the 1900s when T.A. Dorgan was supposedly "inventing" the term.

 

3. B) St. Louis "Louisiana Purchase Exposition" in 1904 – Bavarian concessionaire Anton Feuchtwanger loaned his customers white gloves to protect their hands from the steaming wieners.  Most patrons failed to return these gloves, and his supply began running low. Feuchtwanger allegedly asked his brother-in-law - a baker by trade - for help. The brother-in-law improvised long soft rolls that fit the meat, and thus invented the hot dog bun.  However, others claim that a German immigrant sold sausages, along with milk rolls and sauerkraut, from a push cart in New York City's Bowery during the 1860's.  Another report states that in 1871, German butcher Charles Feltman opened up the first Coney Island hot dog stand, and sold 3,684 dachshund sausages in a milk roll during his first year in business. By the way, wieners and frankfurters don't become hot dogs until someone puts them in a roll or a bun.

 

4. D)New York – In 2004, New Yorkers consumed $112.7 million worth of frankfurters and "better for you" hot dogs using statistics prepared by Information Resources Inc.  Hot dog sales in Los Angeles and the Baltimore-Washington came in at second and third in total supermarket dollar sales.

 

5. D) Ronald Reagan – in 1980.  Two other presidents also served hot dogs at official White House functions: Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter served them at a White House picnic in 1977 and Franklin D. Roosevelt served King George VI and Queen Elizabeth of England hot dogs and beer at a picnic during a White House visit in 1939.

 

6. C) 1,996 feet – The Sara Lee Corporation made a 1,996 foot wiener in honor of the 1996 Olympics. It took over 2,000 buns to hold the huge hot dog that wrapped twice around the Georgia Dome field.

 

7. C) Yellow – On July 4, 2004 champion Takeru Kobayashi set a new world record and walked away with a yellow belt after eating 53.5 wieners with buns in 12 minutes, earning the coveted mustard yellow belt and retaining his official world crown for the fourth year in a row. Known in the competitive eating world as “The Tsunami”, he earned his title by winning Nathan's Famous Fourth of July International Hot Dog Eating Contest in New York, a competition which started in 1916. Kobayashi also holds world records for eating cow brains. There’s just no accounting for taste, huh?

 

8. B) “Operation Wienerlift”, celebrating National Hot Dog Day, was done to say “thanks” – The hot dog cargo was accompanied by 700 pounds of mustard, 15,000 boxes of CRACKER JACK and 3,500 pounds of beef summer sausage

 

9. A) He has them for dinner every night - As the story goes, eighty-nine-year-old Charlie has eaten hot dogs for dinner every night of his life since he was 11 months old. He eats them on rye bread with the crusts removed-and still loves them.

 

10. D) Franky Frank – Other members of the less popular and quite bizarre Mr. Potato Head “Picnic Pals” set included Willy Burger, Frenchy Fry, Mr. Soda Pop Head, Mr. Mustard Head, and Mr. Mr. Ketchup Head.  They included ketchup and mustard colored parts, plus all new face pieces in the shapes of pickles and onions!  Another variety of friends for Mr. & Mrs. Potato Head were the “Tooty Frooty Friends” line, which included Oscar Orange, Pete the Pepper, Cooky the Cucumber, and Katie Carrot.

 

11. C) Signed buns Burt Reynolds was the first big name to eat at Packo's and sign a hot dog bun, when Tony’s daughter Nancy wanted him to write his name on something to commemorate his visit. It occurred to Reynolds to put his pen to Packo's breadstuff.  This precedent was followed by scores of celebrities, including President Clinton, Mickey Mouse, Emmitt Smith (Dallas Cowboys), and NASA astronaut Donald Thomas (who took Tony Packo's Hot Dog Sauce aboard Space Shuttle Columbia in 1997).  Thousands of autographed hot dog buns now are enshrined on Packo's walls. The tradition of "bun signing" continues to this day.

 

Baseball & Hot Dogs (top)

 

12. B) 26 million – That’s enough to stretch from Yankee Stadium in New York City to Dodgers' Stadium in Los Angeles! Or, it's even enough to circle the bases 36,000 times. Sometimes more hot dogs are sold than tickets!

 

13. B) St. Louis – Bar owner and German immigrant Chris Von de Ahe, who owned the St. Louis Browns baseball team, introduced the hot dog to Browns' fans in 1893. This is the first recorded linking of hot dog with baseball. And speaking of baseball and hot dogs, Babe Ruth once ate 12 hot dogs and drank eight bottles of soda-pop between games of a scheduled double-header <burp>!

 

14. A) The smell of hot dogs wafting down from the stands was simply irresistible to the hungry players – Free safety and defensive captain Eugene Robinson, quarterback Rick Mirer, and defensive tackle Cortez Kennedy were fined for violating team rules. During the third quarter of a pre-season game in San Francisco, the three players were caught eating hot dogs while standing on the Seahawks' sideline. The three had seen action in the first half of the game and were not slated to return. If not for the presence of network television cameras, they might have been able to consume the hot dogs without being detected. The cameras, however, caught the players "trying furtively to eat the hot dogs."

 

How to Cook & Dress a Hot Dog (top)

 

15. A) Grilled – 60% of Americans prefer hot dogs grilled.  Second choice was boiling, at 21%, followed by microwaving (8%), pan frying (4%) and steaming (3%).

 

16. B) Mustard – Mustard remains the “wiener” at 32% (and 87% of hot dog eaters use it). Ketchup is preferred by 23% (though it ranks #1 among younger adults), though the Hot Dog and Sausage Council recommends against consuming ketchup on hot dogs after the age of 18. Chili came in third at 17%, followed by relish (9%) and onions (7%). Southerners showed the strongest preference for Chili, while Midwesterners showed the greatest affinity for ketchup. Nationwide, however, mustard prevailed. Interestingly, though ketchup remains one of the most popular condiments on hot dogs, "properly made" hot dogs, like the Chicago-style, usually lack the condiment. Those who consider themselves hot dog connoisseurs are often vehemently opposed to eating (or even witnessing) hot dogs with ketchup; they think the flavor of ketchup overpowers and destroys the taste of the hot dog instead of complementing it. In some Chicago hot dog stands and restaurants, ketchup is not offered as a hot dog condiment. Furthermore, asking for ketchup may result in a rebuff by the vendor (perhaps a refusal to serve the requested order or a slamming of hands on the counter).

 

17. D) Kansas CityKansas City Dogs are served with sauerkraut and melted Swiss cheese on a sesame-seed bun. Elsewhere in the U.S., Easterners eat more all-beef hot dogs than any other region of the country. New York hot dogs are served with steamed onions and yellow mustard.  Southerners eat Slaw Dogs… dragged through the garden and topped with coleslaw. Midwesterners eat more pork and beef hot dogs than any other region of the country.  Chicago Dogs are served with yellow mustard (NEVER with ketchup!), dark green relish, copped raw onion, tomato slices, and topped with a dash of celery salt on a poppy-seed bun. And Westerners eat more poultry dogs than any other region of the country.

 

Hot Dog Etiquette (huh?) According to the Hot Dog and Sausage Council  (top)

 

18. A) licked away - not washed!  And do not use a cloth napkin to wipe your mouth when eating a hot dog, paper is always preferred.

 

19. C) Use paper plates – China plates are forbidden.

 

20. C) “Dress” the dog - Do not put toppings between the hot dog and the bun. Always “dress” the dog and not the bun!

 

This Dog's on a Roll – The WienermobileTM  (top)

 

21. D) Chicago, 1936 – As an ad gimmick, Karl G. Mayer, nephew of the lunchmeat mogul Oscar Mayer®, invented the company's Wienermobile™. On July 18, 1936, the first Oscar Mayer® Wienermobile™ rolled out of General Body Company's factory in Chicago at a cost of $5,000 and was 13 feet long. The Oscar Mayer® company has a fleet of six cruising America these days. They go all over the place, spreading the good news about, well, Oscar Mayer® wieners, what else? The Wienermobile™ vehicle has traveled in the U.S., Canada, Japan, Puerto Rico and Spain. In the year 2000, it added Mexico and Germany to the list too!  Each Wienermobile™ vehicle travels about 1,000 miles per week or about 50,000 per year.

 

22. D) 1,000,000 hot dogs – that’s about 5 tons of lean mean machinery that is twenty-seven feet long, 11 feet tall.

 

23. A) Love Connection – along with “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno”, “Late Night with David Letterman”, “CNN Headline News” and “The Late Late Show with Tom Snyder”.

 

24. C) 2 "Ladybugs," starring Rodney Dangerfield, and "Another You," starring Richard Pryor and Gene Wilder.

 

25. C) Little OscarGeorge Molchan, who portrayed company mascot Little Oscar died on April 12, 2005 at the age of 82. The WienermobileTM that George Molchan drove in life stood parked at his grave side, eliciting smiles from the dozens of friends and family present.  The 50 or so people at the Calumet Park Cemetery grave site broke into a chorus of the company theme song, "I'd love to a be an Oscar Mayer®  wiener," followed by a few quick blasts on miniature, hot-dog shaped whistles handed out to the crowd.  Not your typical burial, but Molchan would've loved it, a bystander said.

26. B) Madison, Wisconsin – (the headquarters of Oscar Mayer since 1955!) The city council — in this most progressive of American cities — sought to rid vehicular advertising from their fine streets. But then one astute council member asked the key question, “Are we banning Little Oscar?"

 

27. A) “Hotdoggers” – To become a “hotddogger,” you need a college degree and you should be skilled in the field of communications, journalism, advertising, marketing or public relations. More than 1,000 "wiener wannabees" apply to Oscar Mayer® every year for the right to be an official "Hotdogger" for one year—for the privilege of driving one of those big dogs down the street. But Oscar Mayer® picks only the top dogs; of those 1,000 applicants, only 21 cut the mustard. The 21 lucky wieners, er, winners are sent to Hot Dog High at the Oscar Mayer® headquarters in Madison, Wisconsin. The subjects at Hot Dog High are always "meaty." Students learn all about Oscar Mayer® history and products, get briefed on special events planning, and pick up the secrets to maneuvering their buns in traffic.  Graduates are officially sworn in by the President of Oscar Mayer®, and they take the Hotdogger Oath: “As official Hotdogger of the celebrated Oscar Mayer® Wienermobile™, I salami swear to uphold the dogma set forth here, and I promise to encourage wiener lovers nationwide to relish the delicacy, ketchup on the great taste of hot dogs, and give in to the craving once it's mustard. Be frank and furtermore, to be upstanding in a line for hot dogs at ball parks, barbecues, buffets, and other bashes. Journey into the streets, dachs und ports of my community, wish well to all comers, plump and lean -- and leave them with a wiener to roast about. As once I wished I were, now I am -- an Oscar Mayer® Wienermobile™ Hotdogger.”  And then they drive around in those vehicular vittles, telling people all about the wonders of hot dogs and Oscar Mayer® and other stuff. Some Hotdoggers have even appeared on MTV, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, and The Late Show with David Letterman.  Now that's what I call runnin' with the big dogs!

 

28. C) Al Unser, Jr. He topped off at a speed of 110 mph.

 

29. A) 2 cents – and they were sold in vending machines.

 

30. B) Richard Trentlage - in 1963

 

31 D) Vienna Symphony Orchestra – In 1968 the Vienna Symphony Orchestra performed the tune in a commercial that ended with a little boy clapping at the orchestra's performance and then taking a bite out of a wiener. An announcer closed by saying "The Oscar Mayer wiener—a classic."  The ditty was also recorded by the Berlin Symphony Orchestra, as well as a teenage rock band, a string ensemble and a Nashville country western group.  My apologies if the little ditty is now stuck in your head for the rest of the day.

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